Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick)


Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick) made with a healthier shortening substitute.

Yesterday I was talking with my cousin and we were discussing quick and easy dinners. She mentioned a family favorite at her house is a recipe found on a Bisquick box called Impossibly Easy Cheeseburger Pie. I asked her more about the recipe and her reply was “just look on the box, it is on all the yellow Bisquick boxes”.  I tried to recall the last time I actually even picked up a yellow box of baking mix at the grocery store. I think it has been years.

It’s not the mix, it’s what’s in it

It’s not that I  have a problem with Bisquick. I have a problem buying stuff in duplicate.

Flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and shortening, that’s it. That’s all it takes to make DIY Bisquick, and I have plenty of that on hand, always.

Flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and shortening is all it takes to make your own Baking Mix

So, why pay a premium just for the “convenience” of buying all the stuff I already have in my pantry in a pre-made mix? 

Yeah, I don’t know either.

And that is exactly the thought process that got me started mixing up my own spice blends, mixes, and seasonings.

Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick) was one of my first homemade swaps for a commercial pantry staple and has become a kitchen mainstay. I mix up a batch and keep it in my pantry. I try to make sure I have some on hand all times, it really comes in handy for a quick batch of pancakes or biscuits.

When stored in an airtight container your baking mix will keep for several months in your pantry.  I personally go through the amount this recipe makes in about a month. If you are wondering this recipe mixes up the equivalent of a large box of Bisquick (about 40 ounces).

Shortening Update 5/23/17

Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick) made with organic Palm Oil makes great baked goods.

So many of you have commented that you want to make this mix, but don’t love traditional shortening, or can’t use it because of allergies. I actually have done quite a bit of research and tested out a few substitutes before I found one that will consistently produce good results regardless how you are using your baking mix, and I can very confidently say that palm oil shortening is your go to substitute for this mix, and I specifically like   Spectrum Naturals Organic Shortening

I have noticed from your comments that there is a lot of interest in the use of Coconut oil as a shortening substitute in this Baking mix, maybe because a lot of us already have it sitting in the pantry? But, I found that coconut oil can make some baked goods heavy and chewy, and there is that slight coconut flavor, that made the use of coconut oil less than desirable for me.

At the risk of sounding like a commercial, I like Spectrum Naturals Organic Shortening because it’s not hydrogenated, has zero grams of trans fat, and is made from palm oil, which is naturally cholesterol-free, has a neutral flavor, and bakes up wonderfully with the texture and lightness you would expect from shortening. If allergies were a concern for you with regular shortening, Spectrum Palm Oil Shortening is gluten, casein, and soy free. It is also cultivated and pressed in an environmentally sustainable manner.

While I really, really like Spectrum Naturals Organic Shortening one of it’s biggest drawbacks is the price. I picked up my container at Wegmans for around $9, it is slightly more expensive at Amazon, a 24 oz container will cost you about $12. I don’t use a ton of shortening, so for my own needs, this seems to be a worthwhile healthier occasional purchase.


I have been using this recipe for Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick) found at King Arthur Flour forever. This is one of the best recipes for Baking Mixes around, the only changes I have ever needed to make to it was occasionally doubling it.


Homemade Baking Mix (DIY Bisquick)

  • Author: Jennifer Morrisey
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes


  • 9 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 5 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup Spectrum Naturals Organic Shortening or traditional vegetable shortening (Crisco)



  • In a large bowl, blend together the dry ingredients. Then, with a pastry cutter, a fork or your fingertips, cut or rub in the vegetable shortening until it is evenly distributed and the resulting mixture looks like cracker crumbs.


  • Place the mix in a large, airtight container (I had a plastic canister that was empty to store mine in, but Ziploc bags work well too) or divide it into pre-measured 2 cup portions don’t pack the baking mix into the measuring cup when measuring . It will make approximately 7 batches of 12 pancakes.
  • If you decide to include whole grain flours in your baking mix for a healthy spin, you are introducing the perishable oils that come from the germ of the grains that may deteriorate at room temperature. Mixes made with whole grain flours will best be stored in an airtight container in the freezer.

Using Homemade Baking Mix:

2 cups Homemade baking mix
1 cup milk
2 eggs
Heat greased or buttered griddle or skillet over medium-high heat.
Stir all ingredients until blended. Pour by slightly less than 1/4 cupfuls onto hot griddle.
Cook until edges are dry.
Flip, and continue cooking until the pancakes are golden.

2 1/4 cups Homemade baking mix
2/3 cup milk
Heat oven to 450ºF.
Stir ingredients until soft dough forms.
Turn onto surface dusted with flour or additional baking mix.
Knead 10 times. Roll dough 1/2 inch thick.
Cut with 2 1/2-inch cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown.

Have you ever made your own baking mix? What prompted you to go the homemade route? Was it for healthier foods? So you could be in control of the ingredients? I would love to hear your thoughts! In the upcoming days I will be sharing some simple recipes that use this baking mix. Make sure you check back for them!

Homemade Baking mix uses beyond biscuits and pancakes

Here are just a few recipes I have used homemade baking mix in. What are your favorite uses for homemade baking mix? Let me know in the comments below!

Coconut Impossible Pie Recipe This pie is so incredibly easy to make! It forms 3 pie like layers while baking, almost impossibly! Hence it’s name!




Double Streusel Coffee Cake Homemade baking mix is used in this cake and the streusel of this cake.




Why pay a premium just for the


  1. Biscuit Mix versus Baking Mix

    The first mix has no sugar, and the second mix HAS sugar. Would there be different types of recipes that would use the first rather than the second? For example, I could see using the first but not the second in a vegetable quiche

    • Are you interested in the sweet impossible pies or savory versions?
      I actually have never made an impossible pie, in theory, this mix should be able to be substituted in equal amounts for the Bisquick specified by your recipe. I have found a recipe for Impossibly Easy Breakfast Bake that looks like a good “breakfast for dinner” option 🙂 I will test this out tonight and update the post & let you know!

  2. For those who asked about powdered milk: This recipe is almost identical to the Missouri Mix recipe I received through 4-H back in the 70’s, except that my recipe includes 1 cup +2 TBS dry milk powder. Then when making biscuits you only have to add water.

  3. I have been living in China, coming from the States for more than 12 years now and “Western Goods” are very expensive here even if you shop some of the big city stores like “Metro” etc. So, why not buy local ingredients, which are very affordable and a few things that I buy from Taobao, (which is the online shopping web site everyone knows about here in China) and make my own at a fraction of the cost?

  4. Thank you for sharing your recipe, and especially for providing the details of using the mix in making biscuits, pancakes and waffles. I have seen other, similar recipes for creating the baking mix, but most of them say to use it by following “the directions on the Bisquick package”. Umm . . . would that be the Bisquick package that I don’t have, because I have made my own mix? You mentioned that you also use the mix in dumplings and cobblers. I would love to see the directions for those, as well. Many thanks.

  5. Hi Jennifer,
    I’ve been looking for a homemade biscuit mix in a big batch and came across your recipe and would love to give it a try but I need to know if I can use butter flavored shortening and if so does it need to be refrigerated?
    Thanks in advance,

  6. Hello:

    I would like to try making your home made mix. What shortening do you use? How are you able to keep the home made mix in the pantry for some time without it going bad because of the shortening? For 9 cups flour there doesn’t seem to be enough sugar?

    • I use butter flavored crisco, but unflavored would also work. I have never had a problem with it spoiling or going rancid. If you are using this mix to make a cake a lot of times additional sugar will need to be added, but for pancakes and biscuits the amount in the recipe is spot on!

  7. In the hot chocolate mix use Nido whole powdered milk rather than low fat powered milk. Made by Nestlé for the Latin market. Doesn’t have that strange taste of low fat powered milk. Can be found in the international foods section of most large supermarkets, Walmart carries it.

    • I have never heard of this kind of powdered milk, I will definitely try it in a homemade hot cocoa mix. Thank you for the tip!

  8. This is so exciting! I love making buttermilk pancakes with bisquik and cannot wait to get away from the creepy traditional mix. However, I *really* dislike sweet pancakes and never add any sugar to the batter, although the box suggests it in some of its versions of pancake recipes. Do you find that the 1/4c sugar in this mix makes the resulting bakes/food items very sweet? Or is it simply a substitute for all the corn syrups and undoubtedly bad sugary things in the original bisquik? Wondering if I should omit the sugar or cut it back slightly…?


    • This is definitely not a sweet mix, when I used it to make Double Streusel Coffee Cake I had to add more sugar to the cake batter.
      If you trying to reduce your sugar intake, you could try substituting your favorite sugar replacer, I have never tried that, but I don’t see why it would not work!

  9. Just made a batch of biscuits using your mix. I wanted to get away from the wonky chemicals, preservatives and aluminum that the store bought brand uses, and they came out excellent!

  10. I dont always have Bisquick on hand, but I usually always have basic baking needs. I also enjoy making things from scratch for my family.

  11. II moved to Australia from the US 4 years ago and have found that a great many already made things just aren’t available here so I am enjoying learning to make things from scratch. Thanks for this! 🙂

  12. I have wanted to make my own mix for years but never did. Then I stumbled across yours and decided to try it. I did a half and half wheat n white flour mix and used coconut oil and its awesome thank you. My kids are excited because they get to help make the next batch when needed. They love the homemade foods so much better then boxed.

  13. I found your recipe while looking for DYI Bisquick recipes. I retired and moved to Mexico and found that they don’t sell/have Bisquick here. This is a saver…thanks!

  14. I live abroad where packaged mixes aren’t available. This is a lifesaver – thanks! You asked if we make other DIY items? For one thing, I make my own vanilla extract. Fill an attractive glass bottle with vodka (use the best you can afford for a superior taste) and one large vanilla pod, slightly pierced. I looks gorgeous on a countertop and you just top off with more vodka when needed. Replace the vanilla pod every year or so.

    • Yay! I am so glad you found this recipe!
      We were gifted with a ridiculously large jug of good vodka (I have no idea why) But homemade vanilla sounds like a perfect use for it!

  15. I have a receipe that I have been using for nearly 50 years that I got from an aunt. It can be substituted cup for cup for either bisquik or teabisk. It consists of 9 cups all purpose flour, 1 cup + 2 Tbsp powdered milk, 1/3 cup baking powder, 4 tsp salt, 1 3/4 cup vegetable oil, mix until crumbly, store in air tight container (2 months in cool dark place or 6 months in freezer).
    I use it for pancakes, waffles, dumplings, fruit crumbles as well as shortcake and biscuits.

    • I am going to have to try this! I always have dried milk around I am not quite sure what to do with (my bread recipes call for very little)

      When you mix it do you for pancakes or waffles do you sub. the milk that is called for with water because of the dried milk?

      • I just found your recipe and am definitely going to try it and very possibly the one mentioned in this post. I’ve often made homemade baking mix and love it but I couldn’t find the recipe I always use. You mentioned not knowing what to do with leftover powdered milk. I make my own hot cocoa mix. That is 1-1/2 pkgs of dry milk, 1 16-oz pkg of powdered sugar (sifted), 2 8-oz cans of unsweetened cocoa and 1 6-oz jar of nondairy coffee creamer. Mix and store air right. To make cocoa, use 1/4 cup cocoa mix per mug of hot water.

        • I am definitely going to try making your hot cocoa mix when it cools down a little! The kids love hot cocoa in the winter, and it seems like we go through a ton of it!

        • am not sure what u mean by package of powder milk here it comes in large boxes so how much is in a package please, thank u waunda

          • Hi Waunda,
            I was curious about the package size also, and emailed Cookie about this she responded, and I put together the recipe in printable format HERE

    • Sara,
      That coffee cake recipe does look delicious! I could see how the cake could be a little more like the texture of a biscuit without enough liquid or because of atmosphere dryness. I am making up a fresh batch of baking mix later this afternoon and will give this recipe a try, the kids will be thrilled to come home to this for a little snack after school!

  16. I make my own baking mix all the time, except I do not add the shortening. I add it instead when Im ready to make the pancakes or biscuits. But I will try it with coconut oil, thus, one less step. I make my own so that I can control the ingredients in what we eat. I am determined to avoid buying processed food.

    Looking forward to seeing your other recipes for this mix (like a good peach cobbler). Thanks for sharing

    • I have never tried adding the shortening later when I am using the recipe, but I could see where you may want to sub out butter in certain recipes. I have been playing around with a skillet cherry cobbler recipe using baking mix for the topping, and I will definitely share. Peach cobbler sounds so good right now, I have not had any since summer. It might be time to pull some frozen peaches out 🙂

    • I am going to update my recipe post to include this! I use it exactly like Bisquick.

      2 cups Homemade baking mix
      1 cup milk
      2 eggs
      Heat greased or buttered griddle or skillet over medium-high heat.
      Stir all ingredients until blended. Pour by slightly less than 1/4 cupfuls onto hot griddle.
      Cook until edges are dry.
      Flip, and continue cooking until the pancakes are golden.

      2 1/4 cups Homemade baking mix
      2/3 cup milk
      Heat oven to 450ºF.
      Stir ingredients until soft dough forms.
      Turn onto surface dusted with flour or additional baking mix.
      Knead 10 times. Roll dough 1/2 inch thick.
      Cut with 2 1/2-inch cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet.
      Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown.

        • I don’t. I just stir until a soft dough forms and use a large cookie scoop to drop the biscuits onto the baking sheet. Works like a charm 🙂

        • Hi Jenny! Here are the direction and recipe for waffles, let me know what you think!

          2 cups Homemade Baking Mix
          1 1/3 cups milk
          1 egg
          2 tablespoons vegetable oil
          A splash of vanilla extract (optional but I like to add it)
          1 Heat waffle iron; spray with non-stick baking spray or coat lightly with vegetable oil or shortening.
          2 Stir ingredients until blended. Pour some batter into the center of hot waffle iron. Close lid and bake.
          3 Bake about 3-5 minutes or until steaming stops (it really depends on your waffle iron, mine takes 4 minutes)

  17. Getting ready to try this since we don’t have enough bisquick! I am also trying to get away from packaged mixes. I had one question though, the bisquick package said it has baking soda in it but yours does not, not do any others I see. Is it not necessary? I am doing a small recipe today but hope to do yours later to have on hand.

    • I have never had any problems with this recipe, pancakes and biscuits all have risen nicely.
      The difference between the homemade version and packaged may be because of the bisquick formulation. Baking soda and powder are both leaveners, baking soda needs to be balanced with an acidic ingredient, without it the resulting taste may be metallic, most likely one of the added ingredients in bisquick counteracts this. Baking powder has the acidic ingredient already added in, a baking powder substitute can be made at home with a combination of baking soda and cream of tarter.
      Hope this long and sciency explanation helps 🙂

  18. While holiday baking I ran out of Bisquick mix and needed some for my sausage balls so I googled homemade Bisquick and found your site. Thanks Jennifer for a great recipe! The sausage balls turned out perfect.

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